Event Wrap-Up: Brad Magnus on 3D & Virtual Reality Video Editing

With the advent of new technology comes new opportunities to create immersive experiences for marketing and brand exposure. Brad Magnus joined us Tuesday to show us how 360 degree video and virtual reality can transform the creative scope of what agencies currently offer clients.

While some technology may be fleeting, the investments major corporations like Facebook and HTC have made in virtual reality in recent months boosts the likelihood that virtual reality is here for good. Brad made the point that the majority of 360 degree content can be consumed via cellphone now unlike other recent tech ventures like 3-D TVs –further ensuring that this technology is here to stay.

“What makes [360 degree video] applicable is you can experience those 360 degree experiences on a cell phone unlike other technologies that have failed in the past…”

Alongside the usual video production timeline of script writing, planning, and scouting of locations, the timeline for 360 degree video also needs to leave ample time for the processing of the footage. The workflow for this type of video looks more like the following due to the unique nature of what these new cameras capture:

  1. Capture the video: Find the budget you want to work within to determine what equipment you’ll want to purchase/use for the project. Cameras can range from a few hundred, to thousands of dollars depending on their resolution —so plan accordingly.
  2. Stitch the videos together: Each camera’s capture is different, some include software to do it for you, some do not. Make sure to leave ample time in your production workflow for this process as it can take up to 24hrs to process.
  3. Edit the videos: Using the Adobe workflow, Brad showed us how you can seamlessly switch from Adobe AfterEffects to PremierePro to add text that seamlessly integrates into the 360 degree video capture, and how to edit video in this new dimension.
  4. Export the videos: Exporting and compressing the video to make it usable for marketing efforts is the most important part in order to allow all your hard work to be seen. Facebook’s investment into the technology has made for an easy avenue to showcase your handiwork.

From patches to account for adding animations and text to the 360 degree video, to the stitching process, and variety of equipment set ups, Brad gave us the run-down on what the opportunities are for the next age of media. As promised, Brad covered his eyes, and drew a winner for the year’s subscription to Adobe Creative Cloud and Greg Nobles was the lucky recipient.

If you’re interested in learning more about this topic, working with Brad, or joining his monthly video club meetings to discuss technologies such as this, you can check out his website: bradmagnusdesign.com.

Be sure to mark your calendars for our next event at the Gray Fossil Site with Clark Rector from AAF National on September 15th at 11:30!

Full Event Video

 

Event Photo Gallery

 

Connecting the Unconnected

Event Wrap-Up: Connecting the Unconnected

Thank you for attending
Connecting the Unconnected

We all packed into Main Street Pizza KPT to hear Mike Watson, founder of Heart-centric Leadership, speak on Connecting the Unconnected. He referenced Darwin, Einstein, and Picasso. He taught us about theme mapping and how we can discover what seemingly unrelated objects, like an automobile and a room, have in common. Mike shared with us three common hiring blueprints for startups and told us which was the most successful. Then, proceeded to tell us why even the most successful model would fail over the long term; leadership should willingly invite in diversity and opposition. If everyone is the same, you weed out diversity and your thinking as a group becomes narrow.

Most importantly he shared with us this key message: It is impossible to think creatively by looking harder in the same direction. Good advice to remember next time you hit a creative wall (which happens to us all at some point or another – event though Christian was the only one to admit it).

Mike was kind enough to share his presentation and notes from last week’s event. (download PDF  | download PPT). Enjoy!

We look forward to seeing you again July 20 at 11am in Eastman’s Toy F. Reid Center, Room 225 for our next event. Details to come.

Connecting the Unconnected

Connecting the Unconnected

Thursday, June 9
11:30am – 1:00pm
Main Street Pizza, Kingsport

Mike Watson, founder of Heart-centric Leadership, will talk about the idea of connecting the unconnected, as this concept relates to relationships in life and design. Watson will focus on how we think when creative, how to structure ourselves and our environment to support creativity. He will also demonstrate how we can connect the seemingly unconnected to produce innovative solutions more consistently.

RSVP now to save your spot!


 

Mike Watson PhotoMike Watson, founder of Heart-centric Leadership (emcMIKE.com) endorses the principles of Conscious Capitalism, believes in working with individuals and leaders who are inclined toward worthy goals, guided by core human values, and in relationship with all stakeholders. He believes in the power of diversity, working collaboratively and the development of insight as a tool for creativity and prosperity. In his pursuit of reshaping lives through his heart-centric leadership model, he has partnered with a wide range of professionals – from CEOs, to emerging leaders and a variety of fine artists.

Mike has been educating, inspiring, creating and directing for the past 25 years, often from a regional perspective. During this time, he has shaped a national retail company’s visual footprint and brand image, has been the speaker coach for multiple high-profile leaders including a CNN hero, and speaker at Parliament, designed retail stores, expanded business models and reshaped communities through his art and by sharing his purpose in life – to reshape leadership so as to reshape lives for the better.

FUSIC

FUSIC: The fusion of film and music

FUSIC, a concept developed by Bob Farnsworth and his team at Hummingbird Productions, is the fusion of film and music. In a broader sense, it is the fusion of anything visual and sonic. With the FUSIC approach, music and sound ideas are brought together with visual ideas at the beginning of a project so they both profoundly influence each other from inception.

Historically, when a film was finished, music and sound were added at the end—film and sound were compartmentalized. If sonic ideas could affect what was shot or even how the film was edited, it was usually too late – “We’re out of time and we’re out of budget.”

Using the FUSIC process, Hummingbird strives to bring everyone around the same table – the agency, film and sound teams. They recommend ad agencies send scripts or storyboards early, so they can immediately bring together directors and composers, who work as a team throughout the production process.

Hummingbird director Casey Cornett says, “At the heart of it, FUSIC is a new way for advertisers to connect with their audiences. I believe when you start applying FUSIC thinking and technology to your creative process, you will never want to proceed any other way on your commercial or film project.”

This is sure to be a well-attended event, so RSVP now to save your spot!


 

Bob FarnsworthEstablished in 1976 by Bob Farnsworth, Hummingbird Productions is one of the longest standing film and music ad production companies in America. Throughout his career, Farnsworth and his team have been directly responsible for creating thousands of commercials, many of which are still being aired today. Hummingbird’s client roster has featured major corporations including Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Ford, Kellogg’s, Budweiser, Purina, Oscar Meyer, Dolby Atmos (now being installed in theaters), and many more. The people at Hummingbird claim “it’s easier to say what we haven’t worked on!”

Bob started his career in music and eventually transitioned into film. He has been featured as an icon in the advertising industry on NBC’s Today Show, is a TEDx speaker, and now travels nationwide with his presentation “The Future is FUSIC.”

A native of Greenville, SC, Farnsworth graduated from Furman University in 1974 with a degree in English, and in the same year became a recording artist with ABC Records. He now lives in Nashville with his wife and 5 children. He is actively involved in the Nashville community through Tres Dias and his church, Covenant Presbyterian. His life focus aligns with Hummingbird’s mission statement: “…desiring to leave the world a better place than we found it, whether by doing a great job or by simply demonstrating kindness.”

 

Student Portfolio Review

2016 Student Portfolio Review

Wednesday, April 20
Doubletree Hotel, Johnson City
6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

This is a FREE event!

AAF NETN invites students to bring their resumes and portfolios to be reviewed by industry professionals from around the region. There is no charge for students or professionals, and you do not have to be an AAF member to attend. Students – this is a great way to gain feedback and make connections that could be useful as you begin your job search! Pros – this is a unique opportunity to give back, and to identify up-and-coming talent right here in our region. RSVP now.

Exploring the History of the Magnavox Brand

Event Wrap-Up: Lunch & Learn, Dec. 3, 2015

George Collins and Magnavox presentation slide

Last Thursday, George Collins, of The Magnavox Historical Preservation Association and curator of the current exhibit at Reece Museum entitled “Magnificent Magnavox,” spoke to us about the history of the Magnavox brand and its connection to Northeast Tennessee. If you were unable to attend the event, here are just a few of the interesting facts Mr. Collins shared with us about the Magnavox brand, as well as some snapshots from the exhibit (there’s still time to catch the exhibit, which runs until Dec. 15, 2015):

  • Magnavox is Latin for “great voice.”
  • At its peak, Magnavox was the fifth largest employer in Tennessee, employing over 500 people in the Greeneville manufacturing operations alone.
  • During WWII, Magnavox launched an ad campaign featuring artwork. They made this artwork available for purchase to consumers, believing there should be music and culture in every home. In order to receive the artwork, you simply clip the order form out of the ad, send it in, and then Magnavox would send you a copy of the artwork.
    Magnavox art
  • In the 1950s, movie stars’ contracts prevented them from being on television. However, Magnavox’s lawyers discovered the contracts did not prevent them from being in ads for televisions. The company used celebrities in their print ads and also featured them on the televisions pictured in the ads.
  • In the 1960s Magnavox began utilizing product placement with a portable TV on Gilligan’s Island.
  • In the 1970s:
    • Magnavox introduced Odyssey, the first home video gaming system in the country. (introduced in 1972)
    • Frank Sinatra became a spokesperson and released a limited edition Magnavox record.
    • Hank Aaron also became a spokesperson.

Interested in learning more about Magnavox?
If you’d like to learn more about the history of Magnavox, visit www.magnavoxhistory.com. Follow The Magnavox Historical Preservation Association on Facebook for up to date information and photos from the “Magnificent Magnavox” exhibit.

Magnavox television

inside a Magnavox

Magnavox television

Magnavox televisions

Magnavox Odyssey gaming system

Odyssey, the first home video gaming system in the country.

Storytelling with Clay Prewitt of The Tombras Group

Event Wrap-Up: Lunch & Learn, Sept. 17, 2015

Earlier in the fall we welcomed Clay Prewitt to AAFNETN. As Associate Creative Director at the Tombras Group, Clay has scripted and produced award-winning spots. Raised on stories at his grandfather’s knee, Clay’s now a master storyteller himself, sometimes through songs and sometimes through slogans, sometimes in many words and sometimes in very few, but always with the ability to connect people through the experiences and emotions of the stories he tells.

Clay with guitar opening Sept. 17, 2015 AAFNETN event.

As attendees filled the room and gathered around Clay, it felt more like he was the one welcoming us. He broke the ice with his guitar and a cover of John Prine’s “That’s the Way the World Goes ‘Round”. Then we were treated to several humorous stories from his childhood. Stories first told to Clay by his grandfather. Clay poetically described how his grandfather used his wit, quick thinking and verbal rhythm to tell a successful story.

“Granddad used crescendos and pregnant pauses; he knew when to talk and when to say nothing at all.”

So how does storytelling relate to advertising?

Every new campaign is the opportunity to tell a story. When telling your stories, take a cue from Granddad:

  1. Put yourself in the shoes of the consumer. (Granddad always put himself into the story.)
  2. If you don’t believe it, no one else will. Your job is to convince the consumer to believe what you say.
  3. It ain’t for everybody. If you’re going to take a chance to reach the right people, you’re also taking a chance that you’re going to offend others. Some people will like it, and some won’t appreciate it at all.
  4. Know when to shut up. Resist the urge to add more – edit yourself. Sometimes you have to let silence do the talking, like the pregnant pauses Granddad used so well. Sometimes you don’t have to say anything at all to tell a story. Clay recalled the ‘Shopping Cart’ spot from Volkswagen’s ‘Driver’s Wanted’ campaign which did just that. He credits it as the first spot to attract his attention to advertising as a method for telling stories.
  5. Don’t take yourself too seriously. To illustrate this example, Clay shared a story. Granddad wore a Member’s Only jacket – apparently long after the trend had passed. When Clay asked why, his grandfather responded, “That’s what was in style the last time I cared.”

The moral of the story?

No matter what aspect of marketing or advertising we’re in, stories matter. From the creative brief to the creative pitch, from the drawing board to the board room, it’s stories that connect, persuade, and influence people. Good stories accomplish great things, and whatever our job titles may be, in reality, we’re all aspiring storytellers.

 

Exploring the History of the Magnavox Brand

Exploring the History of the Magnavox Brand

Thursday, Dec. 3
11:30 a.m – 1:00 p.m.
Reece Museum at ETSU
363 Stout Drive
Johnson City, TN 37614 [map]

 

RSVP with AAF progam chair Hali McCurdy (hali@aafnetn.com).

Free for members, $15 for students, and $25 for non-members.

We encourage you to arrive prior to 11:30 a.m. to explore the exhibit and hear the sounds of a
Magnavox stereo.

Use this link to secure a visitor parking permit for the ETSU campus.

See and Hear Magnificent Magnavox.
George Collins, of The Magnavox Historical Preservation Association and curator of the current exhibit at Reece Museum entitled “Magnificent Magnavox,” will speak about the history of the Magnavox brand and its connection to Northeast Tennessee.

The exhibit, the largest mounted by The Magnavox Historical Preservation Association, features many radios, record players, and televisions from their collection. It tells the story of the products and people which made Magnavox a success in post-war America and particularly in East Tennessee.

The presentation and exhibit will highlight the styles, design, and craftsmanship that made Magnavox one of the premier manufacturers in the country. The units reflect the changing life style and consumer taste from the 1940s through the 1990s. The exhibit shows the roots of Magnavox, which developed the first loudspeaker or “sound reproducer.” Featured is the first-ever single-dial radio made by Magnavox in 1924 in Oakland, California. Also on display, Magnavox’s first television produced in 1948, the cabinet of which was made in Greeneville. The exhibit also features the complete “Spirit of ’76” Collection produced during the American Bicentennial.


George Collins headshot

George Collins is a native of Rainelle, WV. He received his BA in History/Education from West Virginia Wesleyan College and his MA in History Museum Studies from the Cooperstown Graduate Program/State University of New York.

He retired in June 2010 as Director of Museum Program and Studies at Tusculum College, having over 40 years of experience in a variety of roles in museums.

Four years ago, he helped establish the Magnavox Heritage Preservation Association, for which he is the curator. Since that time, he has collected the largest public collection of Magnavox radios, record players, and television technology, written articles, developed a web site, done numerous presentations, and curated three exhibits – including the current exhibit at ETSU’s Reece Museum entitled “Magnificent Magnavox.”

He and his wife Amy, who is the Director of the Archives of Appalachia at East Tennessee State University, live in Tusculum, TN.

Headshots & Happy Hour

Headshots & Happy Hour

Tuesday, October 27
5:30-7:30 pm
Uncorked
316 Broad St #102
Kingsport, TN 37660 [map]

RSVP with AAF progam chair Hali McCurdy (hali@aafnetn.com).

Free for members, $10 for non-members. Entry includes one glass of wine or house drink and appetizers.

Mix, sip, mingle, take a headshot.

Come join the American Advertising Federation (AAF), Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), and American Fundraising Professionals (AFP) for happy hour at Uncorked. Find out what’s so great about the local chapters of these national organizations and how you can get involved.

We’ll have a professional photographer onsite taking headshots so dress your best from the shoulders up!

Storytelling with Clay Prewitt of The Tombras Group

Storytelling

Thursday, September 17, 2015 11:30am – 1:00pm Lamar Advertising Tri-Cities [map] 2020 Gateway Park Court Kingsport, TN 37663

Free for members, $25 for non-members and $15 for students. RSVP with progam chair Hali McCurdy (hali@aafnetn.com). Lunch will be provided.


  “Put one word after another until you are done. It’s that easy, and that hard.” –Neil Gaiman No matter what aspect of marketing or advertising we’re in, stories matter. From the creative brief to the creative pitch, from the drawing board to the board room, it’s stories that connect, persuade, and influence people. Good stories accomplish great things, and whatever our job titles may be, in reality, we’re all aspiring storytellers. Award-winning copywriter and songwriter Clay Prewitt will share a story about stories – why they matter, where he’s found them, how he learned to tell them, and where we might find ours. Raised on stories at his grandfather’s knee, he’s now a master storyteller himself, sometimes through songs and sometimes through slogans, sometimes in many words and sometimes in very few, but always with the ability to connect people through the experiences and emotions of the stories he tells. This is a luncheon you won’t want to miss.


  Clay Prewitt photoAs Associate Creative Director at the Tombras Group, Clay has scripted and produced award-winning spots and is now interested in helping brands “make friends” with potential customers, clients, and/or constituents. His specialties include branding, big ideas, and storytelling. Look for Clay Sept. 18–20 on stage during the Bristol Rhythm and Roots Reunion music festival!